The Greatest Navy Love Of All

Whitney Houston has (had?) a song called Greatest Love Of All. Now what would occur if you sung the Greatest Navy Love Of All and gazed at the below picture:

“Greatest Love Of All”

I believe the children are our future
Teach them well and let them lead the way
Show them all the beauty they possess inside
Give them a sense of pride to make it easier
Let the children’s laughter remind us how we used to be

Everybody’s searching for a hero
People need someone to look up to
I never found anyone who fulfilled my needs
A lonely place to be
And so I learned to depend on me

[Chorus:]
I decided long ago, never to walk in anyone’s shadows
If I fail, if I succeed
At least I’ll live as I believe
No matter what they take from me
They can’t take away my dignity
Because the greatest love of all
Is happening to me
I found the greatest love of all
Inside of me
The greatest love of all
Is easy to achieve
Learning to love yourself
It is the greatest love of all

I believe the children are our future
Teach them well and let them lead the way
Show them all the beauty they possess inside
Give them a sense of pride to make it easier
Let the children’s laughter remind us how we used to be

[Chorus]

And if, by chance, that special place
That you’ve been dreaming of
Leads you to a lonely place
Find your strength in love

Now sing it with me, I believe the USS Gerald R Ford is our future. . .

The Navy’s Newest Sub, the USS Gerald R. Ford

The Navy’s newest submarine, coming to the fleet in 2015, is the USS Gerald R. Ford:

Navy submarine, USS Gerald R. Ford

Just kidding ’bout the sub. It looks that way, with what Business Insider calls a bulbous bow. It is actually the aircraft carrier, USS Gerald R. Ford. I sure hope no falls down the ladderwell. (Speaking of ladderwells, check out this scary one on the USS Kearsarge.)

Things I Learned on an Aircraft Carrier

Aircraft Carriers are built to ferry four acres of United States “soil” around the world. To wherever we may need it. To support and defend allies, to protect American interests, or to attack enemies.

They are not, however, built for tall people. Case in point, the scab I just discovered on the top of my head. I schwacked my melon three times daily the first week I was underway. Slowly, I got more aware and lowered my stats to two and then one hit a day.

I can proudly say that I went whole days towards the end of my cruise without murdering my noggin. My top five skull clangers:

1. Forgetting there is cross-bar as you step into a bathroom stall. I literally felt my teeth rattle in mouth and saw stars with that one. All the bathroom stalls (since they are attached to each other) shook. I apologize in advance to all the guys who have to tighten the bolts. I definitely loosened a couple of them.

2. Turning around in a passageway and missing the low-hanging light. Yes, it was painted bright yellow. No, I was not looking at it. No, it was not as painful as it looked. Yes, the six enlisted folks were amused when I rocked it. Yes, they asked in chorus if I was alright. Yes, one of them gave me the classic: Ohhhhhhhhhhh. No, I did not hang around. Me and my bruised pride wandered off. Quickly.

3. Stepping through a watertight opening and mis-estimating its height by one centimeter. Sure, we use inches in America, but that one centimeter really left a mark. I wonder if that is where my scab came from?

4. Focusing too much on turning the doorknob and not enough on stooping. As I entered the wardroom for lunch. That door made me religious. As in: I prayed no one saw my clumsiness. Dear God, let me never do that again.

5. Forgetting that I had about 20 inches of rack space when I lived in the overflow Chief’s birthing. Who puts an Officer in there anyway? Waking up and clunking your head, priceless. And very effective at getting me awake.

That’s all. No more head knocking stories. I’ve got my reputation to consider here. . .

Go here for Part II, Berthing Aboard an Aircraft Carrier