Two Steps Over the Line

Back when I was an Ensign, I was part of a large wardroom. We were an enormous command, with hundreds of officers. And there is one thing I noticed right off: there were 2 or 3 female officers that got away with improprieties far more than anyone else. None of it was egregious, all was almost-good-natured ribbing. They could be quite brutal on young Ensigns not expecting it. So when I read the story of Adria Richards, of SendGrid, and her run-in with two PyCon dudes, I took it with a grain of salt. I tend to ignore those things.

Joyous Female Ninjas Fight for Afghanistan

Female Afghan National Police (ANP) officers aim their weapons during a drill at a training centre near the German Bundeswehr army camp Marmal in Mazar-e-Sharif, northern Afghanistan December 11, 2012. German police is mentoring the training program for ANP, as part of an ongoing International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission.

Female Afghan National Police (ANP) officers aim their weapons during a drill at a training centre near the German Bundeswehr army camp Marmal in Mazar-e-Sharif, northern Afghanistan December 11, 2012. German police is mentoring the training program for ANP, as part of an ongoing International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission.

Also in the same photo essay is this shot of a female German police instructor, chatting with Afghani police trainees. Some appear to be listening, others not so much:

A German police instructor talks to female ANP officers before a drill at a training center near the German Bundeswehr army camp Marmal in Mazar-e-Sharif, northern Afghanistan on Dec. 11.

A German police instructor talks to female ANP officers before a drill at a training center near the German Bundeswehr army camp Marmal in Mazar-e-Sharif, northern Afghanistan on Dec. 11.

I tip my hat to the lady Afghanis. Good luck to them and their future career. . .

Female Naval Officers

I stumbled across an eclectic blog of a blogger who lives in Italy. She is a freelance journalist and a writer. And when it comes to female Italian naval officers, she writes that they are called Sir:

Yes, Sir.