The Caucasian Menace

I have an academic class I am finishing up for work. (I’ve been just finishing it up for a month now. It draggggggggs on and on.) I promised myself when I was done, I would buy Clark Zlotchew’s book, The Caucasian Menace. I worried perhaps the title of Clark’s book might be a nod to a Lindsay Lohan biography, but fortunately no:

Clark Zlotchew, The Caucasian Menace

Clark Zlotchew, The Caucasian Menace

Daghestan, which has broken away from the Russian Federation, has nuclear warheads. The usurping dictator is intent on selling some of these to Iran. He also holds a Russian nuclear physicist he intends to sell. To prevent interference with his plans, the usurper has nuclear missiles trained on key European capitals. Neither the U.N. nor NATO will take action. The United States, wishing to avoid a nuclear disaster, cannot take overt action. CIA operatives Baker and Gold are assigned to the case.

Complicating matters, Baker’s wife had been tortured and murdered years before by Thorne, the sadistic mercenary now employed by the usurper. Gold fears that Baker may have killing Thorne as his top priority, rather than capturing him for questioning. Meanwhile, William Bell, their immediate superior, has been selling information to the usurper that could result in failure of the mission and the deaths of Baker and Gold.

I am on board! And rather than waiting, I just bought the book via Kindle. Now I gotta finish up this painful class. Monday is a holiday, so The Caucasian Menace will soon be mine.

Update: So much for my class, I have started the Menace and it is great!

The Sky Was Black

When they reached their ship, Ed gazed out at the bay. It was black. The sky was black, but the bay was even blacker. It was a slick, oily blackness that glowed and reflected the moonlight like a black jewel. Ed saw the tiny specks of light around the edges of the bay where he knew ships must be docked, and at different points within the bay where vessels would be anchored. The lights were pale and sickly yellow when compared with the bright blue-white sparkle of the stars overhead, but the stars glinted hard as diamonds, cold as ice. –Clark Zlotchew