Women in Combat Roles

It is probably not news to you, newsies that you are, that SecDef Leon Panetta formally ended the military ban on women serving in front-line combat roles:

The decision by outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is expected to be formally announced on Thursday and comes after 11 years of non-stop war that has seen dozens of women killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Female soldiers train on the firing range wearing new body armor.

Female soldiers train on the firing range wearing new body armor.

They have represented around 2 percent of the casualties of those unpopular, costly wars, and some 12 percent of those deployed for the war effort, in which there were often no clearly defined front lines, and where deadly guerrilla tactics have included roadside bombs that kill and maim indiscriminately.

“This is an historic step for equality and for recognizing the role women have, and will continue to play, in the defense of our nation,” said Democratic Senator Patty Murray from Washington, the outgoing head of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee.

Capt. Sara Rodriguez of the 101st Airborne Division walks through the woods during the expert field medical badge testing at Fort Campbell, Ky.

Capt. Sara Rodriguez of the 101st Airborne Division walks through the woods during the expert field medical badge testing at Fort Campbell, Ky.

Anu Bhagwati, a former Marine captain and head of the Service Women’s Action Network, said her decision to leave the Marine Corps in 2004 owed partly to the combat exclusion policy.

“I know countless women whose careers have been stunted by combat exclusion in all the branches,” said Bhagwati, who called the decision an “historic moment.”

Of course, the ladies will have to meet certain requirements. Like Mikel Ruffinelli, aka the world’s largest hips, would not qualify.

8 thoughts on “Women in Combat Roles

  1. Tough call. As has been said before, on an individual basis I don’t care if the person next to me is male, female, gay, straight, black, white, brown, plaid, whatever … as long as he or she can — and will — do the job.

    What I do fear is that standards will be lowered so that the desired politically correct outcome is attained.

    I also wonder about the effect on unit cohesion and morale, but I’m not smart enough to predict that outcome.

    Interesting times we live in…

  2. I have mixed feelings about women in combat. Reading the link reminded me of Major Megan McClung who gave her all. She was a good friend of my Marine cousin and he spoke highly of her. There are those women who can and will do very well in combat. It is the other women that I worry about. Is that true of men?

  3. If combat arms is now open, then go all the way. Many men are involuntarily assigned to the infantry if they don’t measure up to whatever job they first desired.

    Time to do that to the women.

    I bet the number of women in the military will drop.

  4. Lou: I forgot the story of Major Megan McClung. Thanks for reposting.
    CS: Very good point. And the standard is the standard.

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