Navy Frigates and the 112th Congress

One potential casualty of congressional toe-dragging on the budget is Foreign Military Sales (FMS), or the transfer of old Navy ships to friendly navies. The current ships in limbo are:

• USS Curts (FFG 38); Grant to Mexico; Jan. 25, 2013
• USS Halyburton (FFG 40); Grant to Turkey; March 22, 2013
• USS Mcclusky (FFG 41); Grant to Mexico; Fiscal year 2014
• USS Thach (FFG 43); Grant to Turkey; Fiscal year 2014

Having failed to produce timely defense spending bills or avoid a chaotic end to a year-long march toward sequestration, the recently-deceased 112th Congress also failed for two straight years to approve a normally prosaic measure allowing the transfers of old U.S. Navy ships (like the USS Carr, shown above) to friendly navies.

Having failed to produce timely defense spending bills or avoid a chaotic end to a year-long march toward sequestration, the recently-deceased 112th Congress also failed for two straight years to approve a normally prosaic measure allowing the transfers of old U.S. Navy ships (like the USS Carr, shown above) to friendly navies.

• USS Rentz (FFG 46); Grant to Thailand; Fiscal year 2014
• USS Vandegrift (FFG 48); Grant to Thailand; Fiscal year 2015
• USS Taylor (FFG 50); Sale to Taiwan; Fiscal year 2015
• USS Gary (FFG 51); Sale to Taiwan; Fiscal year 2015
• USS Carr (FFG 52); Sale to Taiwan; March 15, 2013
• USS Elrod (FFG 55); Sale to Taiwan; Fiscal year 2015

I’ve toured the Thach and know the CMC on another of these ships. Frigates are great little steamers, out there alone and afraid. Sad to see them going abroad. . .

12 thoughts on “Navy Frigates and the 112th Congress

  1. In Greek mythology, Typhon was “the father of all monsters” – terrifying even the gods.

    Cut backs are affecting every nation that subscribes to a Military Navy.

    I view ‘Typhon’ and their concept with an open heart especially in these times of austerity. Lets see how well they put their shoulder behind the problems facing Maritime Security (MARSEC).

    They have been successful to date in subduing piracy in its ugly form.

    Simon Murray has the required background, as the following link will show.

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=simon%20murray%2C%20glencore&source=newssearch&cd=1&ved=0CDIQqQIoADAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.theaustralian.com.au%2Fnews%2Fworld%2Fglencore-chief-simon-murray-launches-private-navy-to-combat-somali-pirate-threat%2Fstory-fnb64oi6-1226548351212&ei=EtPqUMXTKs_s0gXx3IG4Aw&usg=AFQjCNEOE0txG6zx4d2mTAaOE-eZXectew&bvm=bv.1355534169,d.d2k

    Yours Aye.

  2. On a separate note, I am glad to see the USS etc… have at least been given a second breath with ‘friendly’ navies.

    It breaks my heart to see vessels being towed out to open seas and destroyed. I have known of many a salty tear being shed when viewing the results of a ship being used for target practice.

    Yours Aye.

    • Heartfelt, Royal Marine, heartfelt. My father was a blue water, 2 war Sailor. When my Uncle Cliff retired he was the senior Chief in the Navy (Not the Senior Chief OF the Navy). I was priveliged to drink (regularly & copiously) with a group of Royal Navy Kiwi’s who’d chased down & cornered the Graf Spree. “Heart of Oak”, indeed.

      • “Graf Spee” that is. Although she did go an a helluva spree while she floated.

        • One of my Uncles was a very young Matelot who made several turn around landings on D Day, Normandy. His role was that of one of the Bren gunners on a landing craft.

          Sadly he died when I was only seven years old, but I do have memories of him. In melancholy moments my Grandfather, Father and my Uncle would pass on stories of his life. I was blown away to hear about his role on D Day and the actions he took part in.

          The first wave he went in on; the LC took heavy MG 42 fire, through it they lost fifty percent causalities. Only to call “down ramp, out troops”, and return through the same procedure under withering fire several more times.

          I knew at the time what my aim in life was; I achieved it fourteen years later at the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines.

          I have the greatest respect for Jolly Jack Tar; I have served alongside him on numerous occasions, and also on active service.

          One of my favourite books is ‘Trafalgar’ (the biography of a battle) by Roy Adkins.

          The survivors of the battle (from all sides) gave their true account to the Admiralty of the day, the details of which were kept for prosperity.

          Hearts Of Oak one and all.

          Yours Aye.

  3. My dad’s destroyer the USS Wiltsie DD-716 went to Pakistan some years ago. My dad (deceased) and uncle were on her while she was in China 1947-1948. My uncle told me some great stories about their time on the river.

    • OakieRover,

      I had to read up up on the USS Wiltsie; she really was in the thick of it through out her service. I’ll bet your Uncle could ‘swing the lamp’ over a few beers…

      Aye.

  4. EB: I don’t blame businessmen trying to protect their goods, like Glencore chief Simon Murray. (And yes, Heart of Oak – all!)
    Struan: Neat. Anytime you want to share a sea story or two, I’ll gladly put them up.
    OR: I shudder to think what has become of the USS Wiltsie since then.

    • Careful, N1 – Know the difference between a war story & a fairy tale? A fairy tale starts out “Once upon a time.” A war story starts out – “This is no shit.” -)

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